Contractors List

Updated 8/20/2018 PDF Document

Contractors List August 2018

The contractors list is composed of individuals, firms, and institutions who are members in good standing with the Council of Texas Archeologists and who contract to conduct cultural resource investigations within the state of Texas.

Not all CTA members may qualify to undertake archeological investigations as required under state or federal statutes. There may also be individuals or organizations who are qualified to provide professional archeological services and who are not members of the CTA. When contracting with an archeologist, it is recommended that more than one estimate be obtained; project cost may vary considerably between organizations. Equal consideration should be given to all individuals or organizations, irrespective of their membership in the Council.

Listing in this directory is voluntary and is not inclusive of all archeologists in Texas who are available for contracting. The entities listed have paid a fee to be placed on the CTA Contractors List. Inclusion in this directory does not guarantee the standards of quality of services performed by a contractor, nor that contract work will be executed in compliance with federal or state guidelines.

10 thoughts on “Contractors List

  1. To whom it may concern,

    I recently subscribed to the contractors list and I was hoping you could post my information at your convenience.

    Thank you,
    Joshua

    Southern Cultural Resources
    Joshua Hamilton and Jason Whitaker
    104 Valero St
    San Antonio, Texas 78212
    Phone: (512) 299-6059
    Email: SouthernCulturalResources@yahoo.com

    Southern Cultural Resources is a small business dedicated to providing archaeological consulting in an efficient and professional manner. Our archaeologists have experience in projects spanning the federal, state, municipal, and private sectors throughout Texas and New Mexico. We can provide the full range of cultural resource management services including archival research, survey, testing, excavation, Section 106 compliance, and geographic information system (GIS) services.

  2. Do you happen to have the Contractor list in excel? I’d like to be able to sort out by region.

    Thanks,

    Julie Murray

    1. Julie:

      Unfortunately, the contractors list is in PDF to preserve the information presented within. If you are a CTA member, you can contact the secretary Kristi Nichols (her email address is on the “Contact Us” page), she may be able to help you.

      Mindy Bonine
      CTA Webmaster

  3. In May received my certification as Principal investigator by T.H.C. would like info on fee to be posted on Contractors List.
    Thanks,
    Charlie Burton

  4. Hi. Our listing apparently lapsed, and I would like to get relisted. What’s the process at this time of year? Thanks. jt

  5. I think I may have found my great grandmother and her two children that died in a lightning strike in 1900 before TX death certificates were issued. Are unmarked graves near Kerens. One of the children was a baby and the other a 12 yr. old. What average costs are there if I get to their bodies and try to extract DNA? Do you think DNA would still be there after 118 yrs? Thank you Pam Brown pam@pamelambrown.com

    1. Hi Pam,

      Thanks for reaching out to us and what an exciting connection! This is a pretty complex area and I suggest that you contact the Texas Historical Commission for some guidance in regards to preserving the graves. Please contact Jennifer McWilliams, Cemetery Preservation Program Coordinator, at jenny.mcwilliams@thc.texas.gov.

      I hope this helps and good luck!
      -Catherine

  6. In doing my genealogy, I ran across a 1st cousin 3x removed named John Jolly that bought 160 acres from Washington Jones in Trinity County, TX in 1865. I have copies of the sale when he bought it, voter registrations for him in Trinity County in 1867 and 1869, the US Census for 1870 that shows John and his family in Trinity County, the US Census for 1880 that shows John’s family but not him, and the sale papers when his wife and children sold the property in 1882. Since John was on the 1870 census and not the 1880 census then it is safe to say he died between 1870 and 1880. I have searched the records of every cemetery in the area and have not found him anywhere so I surmise that he is buried on the property somewhere. Through the Trinity County Appraisal District website I located the current owners of the property with mailing address. I sent them 3 packages with copies of all the documents I have and asked if they had seen any evidence of a grave or small cemetery on the property and, as of today, I have had no response whatsoever from them. Of the 160 acres only 50 has not been cultivated so it would be a smaller area to look at. Their silence makes me believe there may be some evidence on the property. My question is, is there any way short of trespassing I can get on the property to check for myself?

    Thank you.

    Jerry Jolly

    1. Hi Jerry, I think you’d need permission from the landowners. However, I suggest that you contact Jennifer McWilliams, Cemetery Preservation Program Coordinator for the Texas Historical Commission at jenny.mcwilliams@thc.texas.gov. She might be able to provide some guidance on this.

      -Catherine

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